This exercise is cryptic


#1

The start of "Instructions" excludes a clear understanding of where to begin; leaving students lost in question of functionality vs. the sandbox python. How can I, as a student, BEGIN to understand this new idea with such a question? Hmm, it looks like the code won't be accepted by the interpreter. Should I type it anyways? The answer is undoubtedly, yes. Yes, I should.

In most cases of the challenges faced on this site, interpreter rejection is an expected sight. Alas, this is a special case of misunderstanding the expectations written in the problem. Requesting to "Iterate over my_list to get each value" is an unacceptable input to students. As teachers of computer science, we must think of students as computers and learn as Learn(Topic).

Ex. Student.Learn("File Input/Output")
Result: NameError: name "my_list" is not defined.

Students will try and except any errors to make it to 100%.
With that said, I don't want to program myself to except errors but program myself not to make them.

Thanks for reading.

Link:
https://www.codecademy.com/courses/python-intermediate-en-OGNHh/0/3?curriculum_id=4f89dab3d788890003000096


#2

When I Reset the exercise, it shows we have this code provided in the setup...

my_list = [i**2 for i in range(1,11)]

my_file = open("output.txt", "r+")

# Add your code below!

The list is defined. It will be a list of numbers, all perfect squares from 1 to 100.

Written by a CS student, perhaps? This is user-contributed content from way back when, not an iteration along the lines of how CC does it today. As far as I know, there are no actual teachers on staff, only Pro user Advisors and perhaps some consultancy on the Teachers and Classrooms side, but we don't see that over here.

We have to be self-learners, here, and willing to go out on our own and effect deployments of our own projects, taking into account what we pick up in these introductory tracks. That means a lot of time reading the documentation, articles, forums, blogs, technical papers and books. And a lot of grinding. It's not an easy way to learn, which is why only 10% succeed in actually making it a career path.


#3

It took a while to reset all the code in that section. Case closed. Thank you.