The application of what codeacademy teaches

I’ve recently started learning here in codeacademy, and you could say that I’m new to this world of programming.
I chose the Computer Science path, but I can’t find an explanation anywhere as to how are we to apply all the material that we’re being taught here. So for example, I’m studyin python here, but I couldnt really figure out: a) what Python is being used FOR
b) after i’ve mastered the python syntax and techniques, how do I use it outside of codeacademy? how do I use python (as an example) to create a program with a graphic interface for users, outside of the codeacademy practice sheet? in other words, how do I take a program I created in python and make it look like a legitimate user friendly program?
are these questions the courses here cover?
I hope I made my questions clear! thanks in advance!

python is used in a lot, from build modules to data science and back-end web development.

Building a GUI with python is not so common. Although there libraries available (PyQT en kivy come to mind). But python would not be my first choice for a GUI app. Depending on platform and other things, i would very likely Java or C# for GUI programming.

There is also tkinter, but that is more for practice. That GUI looks old, like it was made over a decade ago.

Its not something the course covers, codecademy mostly focuses on teaching programming concepts.

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For Python specifically I’m not sure, but in general the big self-working projects provided are really good for actually seeing how all this comes together in practise. There’s also nothing to stop you coming up with your own projects, for example I was learning HTML, CSS and JS, and I’m using it to build a fully interactive periodic table on my own time and from scratch. For C++ and Java I’m working towards building my own small games, helped largely due to the self-working projects.

In terms of python specifically I don’t believe they use UI’s too often, at least none of the python programs I have used do. Just like any online course you’ll need to do your own outside research to really get to a strong place, however Codecademy is really good at teaching the fundamentals, and some courses do offer that kind of training (eg. the Android Java development course or the Web Development course).

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Hi @arielneil welcome to the forums!

It is difficult to see the connection between learning difficult concepts and applying them in real life. I get it! :slight_smile:
I only know Python as it relates to data science & analysis. It might be good to just simply google how python is used (in conjunction w/other apps like Django) in building a website.

I agree w/@adamgaffney137183916 about coming up with your own projects to apply the skills you’re learning. I know its hard to see how everything fits together in the big picture, but picking something to build that interests you is a great way to keep skills in check and learn more at the same time.

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@arielneil I personally subscribe to python subreddits (like Flask, pygame, Django, Machine Learning) to see the projects people come up with.

They often share them with full code and explanation of the creative process!
It pushes buttons in my head to combine the ideas in different ways. So a lot of my current/future projects are shaped by the ideas I see from what people do with it.

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good idea about Reddit. (I never would have thought of that).
You could also follow people on Github if they make their code/projects public.

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The projects, as @adamgaffney137183916 mentioned, offer a good intro to applying the concepts you’ve learned.


Work started on Tk in 1991…

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