Taking a Vacation 5. pull it together


#1

Can't understand what I'm doing wrong. Please help


#2

@dataace87153,
An Oops-message is always generated by the course-checker....
and as you could read in the Oops-message
the course-checker is using 'Pittsburgh' and the number-Value 1 as arguments
in a particular order.....first-the-city and then the days

So to get a success
you will have to change the =order= of your parameters in your trip_cost function definition.


#3

@dataace87153,

the FUNCTION talk

def myFunc( param1, param2):
    # Begin of =myFunc= FUNCTION-BODY
    # this =myFunc= function- has 2 PARAMETERS param1 and param2
    # param1 and param2 PARAMETERS are used 
    # as -local- VARIABLES throughout the =myFunc= FUNCTION-BODY
    print( param1 + " and " + param2 )
    #End of =myFunc= FUNCTION-BODY

If you want to call/execute the myFunc function
you will have to add a pair of parentheses to myFunc
like
myFunc()
As the myFunc function was defined
as having 2 parameters
you have to provide 2 arguments
in our case 2 string VALUES "Alena" and "Lauren"
like
myFunc("Alena","Lauren")

some quotes from the outer-world:

**argument is the value/variable/reference being passed in,
parameter is the receiving variable used within the function/block**

OR

**"parameters" are called "formal parameters",
while "arguments" are called "actual parameters".**

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
++++ function with 1 parameter using return-statement

def myFunction( param1 ):
    # //Begin of =myFunction= FUNCTION-BODY
    # //=myFunction= function has 1 PARAMETER param1
    # //this param1 PARAMETER is used as a -local- VARIABLE
    # //throughout the =myFunction= FUNCTION-BODY
    return param1;
    # //End of FUNCTION-BODY

You have defined a myFunction function
which takes 1 parameter param1
this param1 parameter is used
as a variable throughout the =myFunction= FUNCTION-BODY.

If you want to call/execute this myFunction function
and this myFunction function was defined
as having 1 parameter param1
you will have to provide 1 argument
in our case a "number VALUE" 4
myFunction( 4 )

some quotes from the outer-world:

**argument is the value/variable/reference being passed in,
parameter is the receiving variable used within the function/block**

OR

**"parameters" are called "formal parameters",
while "arguments" are called "actual parameters".**

============================================

As you are using the return-statement in your myFunction function
you will only get a return-value no-display.
You can however capture this return-value in a variable
and then use the print-method to do a display.

theResult = myFunction( 4 )
print theResult

OR directly

print myFunction( 4 )

#4

Thank you for the answer, but changing the order doesnt give the solution..

I have:

def trip_cost(city, days):
return sum(plane_ride_cost(city),hotel_cost(days),rental_car_cost(days))

and the same mistake


#5

@dataace87153: The sum() function can only take two arguments. If you want to use the three of them, I'd suggest using sum() inside of another sum().

return sum(sum(firstElement, secondElement), thirdElement)

Edit: Like I said on my next post, this can only be used with "lists", which is not the case here.


#6

still doesn't solve:

Oops, try again. trip_cost('Pittsburgh', 6) raised an error: 'int' object is not iterable

i believe is something about making sum with the city


#7

@dataace87153: My apologies!
The function sum() is supposed to be used with lists and it's not the case.
You'll have to manually add each of them.


#8

Got it.!!
I didn't use sum in the end. I had to put return days + days + city

It worked

Thanks