Recognizing second table in results

In the following exercise, when combining multiple tables, (https://www.codecademy.com/paths/data-science/tracks/sql-intermediate/modules/dspath-sql-multiple-tables/lessons/multiple-tables/exercises/left-outer-join)
and in general I’ve had troubles recognizing the beginning of a new table in the results.
Let’s say you have 4 columns in t1 and 4 in t2, and you SELECT *, is there any ‘easier’ way to recognize where t2 (the 5th row) starts in the results, apart from the title?

Hi @chipcoder50004, welcome to the forums!

I’m not really following. Is there a particular reason you would need to know where the second table begins?

LEFT JOIN keeps all the rows from the first table, whether or not there’s a matching row in the 2nd table.

Hi!
It’s to get a better understanding of the tables and which data belongs to which table, having it visualized in a specific query.

To my knowledge no, there’s not a better way of seeing where the 2nd table starts, rather than just actually looking at both tables separately. I mean, I’ve never been concerned with that. I’m just happy if my JOIN works correclty. haha. :slight_smile:

I mean, you could take the results of your JOINS (SQL queries) and(connect to a server using SQLalchemy [generates SQL statements] and psycopg2 [sends SQL statements to the database]), load them into a python notebook (like Google Colab or Jupyter Notebook), create some Pandas dataframes, run some descriptive stats (python), and then visualize them too by isolating or grouping them in specific ways. Or use something like Tableau to visualize your data. But, that may be more than what you want to do.

Yes :joy: that’s a LOT more than what I want to do!
Thanks for the detalled answer!

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