Mac Book Pro or Windows 10 PC to take courses

Does it matter if I have Windows 10 PC or a MAC Book Pro laptop in learning through Code Academy? I tried Lynda.com courses but their instructors uses Mac Book Pro laptops and I have a Windows 10 Laptop which made it confusing for me. .

you will see plenty of developers use macbooks, if you have windows this occasionally means you have to figure out how to things on windows (like installing a package)

there is very little of such problems in the codecademy courses so far i know

windows itself doesn’t do much for you but it has wsl (ubuntu in windows store), that should cover all your basic development needs regardless of what course you’re doing

What do you mean by windows itself doesn’t do much for me? Can you give me specifics? I am not a big fan of Windows 10 anyways and I have a chance to pick up a MAC Book Pro for a good price.

Most non-proprietary tools are text oriented and windows isn’t. Windows does its own thing, wants you to integrate with it to the point where you become dependent on it and can’t break away. That’s their business model, putting you in a position where you have to deal with their licenses. Setting up a development environment that doesn’t involve microsoft involves finding some kind of escape hatch, taking the windows out of windows, and then you may as well use something else.

The main reason you’d use mac is because it’s shiny. It is shiny, but is it anything other than that? And again, you either use apple’s stuff, or you’re setting up your own environment because most of what comes with the os is relatively outdated (exists to run the os, not to serve for development)
Does lynda use macs because that’s the most appropriate tool for the job or because they’re getting paid for that product placement? It probably looks shinier on video, at least.

Linux environments are made by users, it’s there to be useful, not to sell. If you need shiny, or need buttons to click, then linux is terrible. But otherwise it’s probably the better choice.

wsl is a really good place to start - that’s a linux container, that’s the same as what you would get when opening a terminal window on a linux system. the main problem is if you need specific performance characteristics that wsl can’t provide but that won’t matter for most purposes

Thank you ionatan,

I think I will save my money and download Ubuntu in window stores to see how it works.

Going away from an operating system (like windows) to mac/linux takes time (or the other way around), so give it a fair shot.

Ok, I will stay where I am at with the Windows 10 and try the courses.