Full stack developer path

Hi!

I just started the full-stack engineer path and I am confused already. I read in different resources and also on w3c website that you should start with HTML then CSS and then Javascript for the front end part of the full-stack developer training.

Now after setting up your Dev environment (which by the way was confusing already when I got to the advanced javascript with visual studio code part of it. There was some technical stuff I was reading and I was completely clueless what I am reading because I don`t even know anything about javascript yet.)

So, after the “Setting up your Dev environment” part it jumps straight into javascript THEN somewhere down the line we learn about “What is the internet” and “What is web development” and after that comes HTML then some CSS then github, bringing your site online and the back again to CSS…
Sorry, I don`t want to be a pain but I am not sure if it is the right order of the stuty materials… Again I did some research online and engineers, pro web developers are saying that 1. HTML then 2. CSS then 3. Javascript…

So, my questions are:
Is it okay or does it matter if we learn Javascript straight away?

Does the order of the study materials make sense? (Sorry…)

Can we jump to HTML and CSS first and the come back to Javascript then to " Bringing Your Site Online"? or it would mess up the whole learning process?

The link to the Path Description:

https://www.codecademy.com/learn/paths/full-stack-engineer-career-path

Thank you, Zsolt

Hi,

Let me start by saying it’s very sensible (and normal) to study html/css at the same time as javascript. You can also totally introduce javascript basics without mentioning HTML or CSS.

In my high school major they taught 2 different courses: HTML and Java at the same time (to beginners). Java is a heavy-weight language whereas HTML as a language is technically less heavy (and the considerations are more design based). Note at the time they weren’t even teaching CSS (long ago haha). The 2 courses had very different types of difficulty, so it’s apples and oranges to compare them.

Javascript is a heavy-duty language, so it might be normal to be find it difficult at first (note javascript is a whole different thing from java). This will happen if you know html/css or not. A lot of the first exercises in javascript don’t involve html directly if I recall correctly (never did this new path) so you’d only need html/css knowledge for the ones that do. That being said, I’m sure they laid it out so you can do it without any html/css until it’s introduced.

If you feel uncomfortable, definitely try some html/css courses first to get your feet wet.

My opinion as to why they do it this way: to ease the user in to the difficulty of javascript instead of giving a false sense of complacency with html/css.

Hope this note helps, and feel free to follow up with any questions.

4 Likes

Hi, the way you explain it make sense. Thank you! :grinning: