FAQ: Navigation - Generalizations


#1

This community-built FAQ covers the “Generalizations” exercise from the lesson “Navigation”.

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This exercise can be found in the following Codecademy content:

Web Development
Computer Science

Learn the Command Line

FAQs on the exercise Generalizations

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#2

I’m having trouble writing the command that will allow me to navigate through directories to 2014/dec/ in the second section first lesson titled “Navigation” I’ve tried cd 2014/dec/ and cd … 2014/dec/. What would the correct command be to navigate to the directory? Thank you for the help.


#3

At the command prompt, type,

pwd

The path should include,

/home/ccuser/workspace/blog

If we list the contents of the blog directory,

ls

2014 2015 hardware.txt

Two of those entries are directories, 2014 and 2015. Which one are you inside of?


#4

What is the difference between a “file” and a “directory.”


#5

A file is a singular object, usually text, but it could also be media or data. A directory is a branch on a tree containing multiple files and/or other directories.


#6

This happened to me yesterday as well, I found that I was in 2015 directory and was trying to use

cd 2014/dec

The problem with that is that 2014 directory isn’t a child directory of 2015, which means we need to go one level up using:

cd ..

Always use ‘pwd’ to know where you are. And take a look at the file tree structure to see where you are and where you need to go:


#7

What is the difference of the mkdir command and the touch command


#8

mkdir creates a new directory folder.

touch creates a new empty file.

Quite a lot of difference when we think about it.