FAQ: Code Challenge: C++ Functions - Water Plant

This community-built FAQ covers the “Water Plant” exercise from the lesson “Code Challenge: C++ Functions”.

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FAQs on the exercise Water Plant

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My solution:

#include

// Define needs_water() here:
std::string needs_water(int days, bool is_succulent)
{
std::string watering;

if (days > 3 && is_succulent == false)
{
watering = “Time to water the plant.”;
}
else if (days <= 12 && is_succulent == true)
{
watering = “Don’t water the plant!”;
}
else if (days >= 13 && is_succulent == true)
{
watering = “Go ahead and give the plant a little water.”;
}
else
{
watering = “Don’t water the plant!”;
}

return watering;
}

int main()
{
std::cout << needs_water(1, true) << “\n”;
}

Maybe someone knows a better solution?

It does’t matter if I put the int value first and then the bool and viceversa right? I think codecademy needs my code to match theirs in order for me to continue. I was doing the bool first then the int and It was giving me an error. Of course I made the that the passed parameters were in the same order as in the fuction itself.

1 Like

This still worked :slight_smile:

std::string needs_water(int days, bool is_succulent) {
  if (is_succulent == false && days > 3) {
    return "Time to water the plant.";
  } else if (is_succulent == true && days <= 12) {
    return "Dont water the plant!";
  } else if (is_succulent == true && days >= 13) {
    return "Go ahead and give the plant a little water.";
  } else {
    return "Dont water the plant!";
  }
}

int main() {
  
  std::cout << needs_water(10, false) << "\n";
  
}
std::string needs_water(int days, bool is_succulent) {
  
  if (is_succulent == false && days > 3) {
    return "Time to water the plant.";
  } else if (days <= 12) {
    return "Don't water the plant!";
  } else if (days >= 13) {
    return "Go ahead and give the plant a little water.";
  } else { 
    return "Don't water the plant!";
  }
 
}

Because of the nature of the cases, you don’t need to include the boolean values for the last 3 cases. There is only one condition with the false bool, so as long as it’s first everything is okay.

1 Like

Hey guys, just wanted to offer a tip:
“is_succulent == true” is the same a “is_succulent” and “is_succulent == false” is the same as “!is_succulent”

3 Likes

That is what I did:

std::string needs_water(int days, bool is_succulent){

if (is_succulent == false && days > 3){

return "Time to water the plant.";}

if (is_succulent == true && days >= 13){

return "Go ahead and give the plant a little water.";}

return “Don’t water the plant!”;

}

This is getting to be bs.
#include
#include
using namespace std;
// Define needs_water() here:
string needs_water(int days, bool is_succulent){
if(is_succulent == false && days > 3){
return “Time to water the plant!”;
}
if(is_succulent == true && days <= 12){
return “Don’t water the plant!”;
}
if(is_succulent == true && days >= 13){
return “Go ahead and give the plant a little water.”;
}
return “Don’t water the plant!”;
}

int main() {

std::cout << needs_water(15, true) << “\n”;

}

this somehow doesn’t work for codecademy, even though it works perfectly.

An automatic grading system will be pretty particular about the test cases. The strings you are returning must EXACTLY match the strings specified in the instructions down to even the punctuation. For the first if statement, the issue is:
Your return string: "Time to water the plant!"
Expected return string: "Time to water the plant."

1 Like

Hi, can anyone explain to me why std::string take boolen?

A function has the form:

return_type function_name(any parameters go here) {
    // function body goes here
}

The return_type of the function doesn’t have to match the parameter types(s).

In this particular challenge, the first parameter is days so it makes sense for this parameter to have int type. The is_succulent parameter is of the true/false nature, so bool makes sense for this parameter. The return type can be of any type. If the function returns nothing, then return type will be void. If it returns a string, then return type will be std::string. If it returns a boolean, then return type will be bool. For this particular function, we are asked to return a string. So, the return type will be std::string.

I know my code is different then from you´ll but why do I get a random number under my displayed answer? The rest works fine.


#include

#include

#include

// Define needs_water() here:

int needs_water(int days, bool is_succulent){

std::vector std::string answer;

answer.push_back (“Time to water the plant.”);

answer.push_back (“Don’t water the plant!”);

answer.push_back (“Go ahead and give the plant a little water.”);

answer.push_back (“Don’t water the plant!”);

if (is_succulent = false && days > 3){

std::cout << answer[0]<<"\n";

}

else if (is_succulent = true && days <= 12){

std::cout << answer[1]<<"\n";

}

else if (is_succulent = true && days >= 13){

  std::cout << answer[2]<<"\n";

}else {

  std::cout << answer[3]<<"\n";

}

}

int main() {

std::cout << needs_water(13, true) << “\n”;

}

You have defined your needs_water function as having a return type of int when you wrote the definition int needs_water(int days, bool is_succulent). Yet your function is not explicitly returning any integer. Your function is just printing statements through std::cout.

In your main function, when the statement
std::cout << needs_water(13, true) << “\n”;
is executed, first your needs_water function is called with the arguments (13, true). This results in one of your if statements triggering a std::cout output from within the needs_water function. Then your function exits without returning any integer. So the statement std::cout << needs_water(13, true) ends up causing undefined behavior. In your case, a gibberish random number is returned, hence exhibiting as undefined behavior.

Don’t be so sure. You should test your program with different arguments to verify that your program is functioning as expected. Specifically your if conditions such as is_succulent = false or is_succulent = true are not comparisons. Comparisons are made using == or !=. If you try testing your program with different combinations of arguments, you will see that the existing program isn’t working as intended. Just because a program compiles successfully doesn’t mean the program doesn’t have errors.

1 Like

Hello. I have the following piece of code:

#include <iostream>

// Define needs_water() here:
int needs_water(int days, bool is_succulent) {
  if (is_succulent == false && days > 3) {
    return "Time to water the plant.";
  } else if (is_succulent == true && days <= 3) {
    return "Don't water the plant!";
  } else if (is_succulent == true && days >= 13) {
    return "Go ahead and give the plant a little water.";
  } else return "Don't water the plant!";
}

int main() {
  
  std::cout << needs_water(10, false) << "\n";
  
}

Why do I keep getting the following errors:

main.cpp: In function ‘int needs_water(int, bool)’:
main.cpp:6:12: error: invalid conversion from ‘const char*’ to ‘int’ [-fpermissive]
return “Time to water the plant.”;
^~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
main.cpp:8:12: error: invalid conversion from ‘const char*’ to ‘int’ [-fpermissive]
return “Don’t water the plant!”;
^~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
main.cpp:10:12: error: invalid conversion from ‘const char*’ to ‘int’ [-fpermissive]
return “Go ahead and give the plant a little water.”;
^~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
main.cpp:11:17: error: invalid conversion from ‘const char*’ to ‘int’ [-fpermissive]
} else return “Don’t water the plant!”;
^~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Thank you!

It is specified in the instructions:
**Note:** Don’t print the strings; return them from the function.
We are supposed to return strings. You are returning strings, but you have declared that the return type of the function should be an int i.e. an integer. You need to fix the declaration by specifying the return type of the function as std::string

1 Like