FAQ: Basic Classes and Objects - this

This community-built FAQ covers the “this” exercise from the lesson “Basic Classes and Objects”.

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In Section 10, .this, the instructions make the assertion that "this.Area = area means “when this constructor is used to make a new instance, use the argument area to set the value of this new instance’s Area field”.

Shouldn’t it say “…this new instances ‘Area’ property”?

2 Likes

i asked myself the same thing, did you learn something about this since posting your question?

The instructions for this concept are frustratingly vague. It’s very hard for a beginner to understand what the reason for using ‘this.’ is, and what the consequences of not using ‘this.’ would be.

I’m aware there is some sort of explanation given for the former, but without knowing what the problem being solved is, it seems like a pointless addition - I’m assuming it isn’t, but that isn’t communicated clearly…

2 Likes

Technically you only need it if there’s a conflict - for example:

 class Class1
    {
        public Class1(string Name)
        {
            this.Name = Name;
        }
        public string Name { get; set; }
    }

Without the “this” the compiler wouldn’t be able to figure out what you are trying to assign.

However, in general, as long as you aren’t naming your properties and parameters exactly the same thing, it’s not needed. For instance, the property is is Name but the parameter is name.

In this example, no “this” is required - in fact, if I were to add it, Visual Studio will even tell me that it’s unnecessary and suggest removing it

    class Class1
    {
        public Class1(string name)
        {
            Name = name;
        }
        public string Name { get; set; }
    }
}