Does one have to declare state within a class component's constructor method?

In the context of this exercise, we are explicitly told:

To make a component have state , give the component a state property. This property should be declared inside of a constructor method [emphasis mine].

They then proceed to give the following example:

class Example extends React.Component {
  constructor(props) {
    super(props);
    this.state = { mood: 'decent' };
  }
 
  render() {
    return <div></div>;
  }
}

But do we have to declare state within a class component’s constructor method? Can we not declare state as a ‘normal’ property of the class component, like this:

class Example extends React.Component {
  state = { mood: 'decent' }
 
  render() {
    return <div></div>;
  }
}

One could still refer to it with this.state, no?

In her getting started with React tutorial, Tania Rascia states that:

Previously, it was necessary to include a constructor() on React class components, but it’s not required anymore [emphasis mine].

and then proceeds to define state without making use of a constructor method.

Are there benefits to defining state within a constructor method? What would be the implications of NOT using a constructor method, especially with regards to props and the this.methodName = this.methodName.bind(this); “binding trickery” introduced in a later exercise?