Def spam():


#1

def spam():
"""prints'eggs'to the console."""

print"eggs!"
shows error msg whats wrong with my code


#2

@sandy6060
What is the Oops- or Error-message stating......


#3

Make sure to indent the body of your function appropriately!


#4

The code that is part of the function should be indented. For example,

def function():
    print "This is a funciton"

Notice how the print statement, which is part of the function, is indented four spaces (1 tab)?


#5

thanks for the help, got it


#6

@sandy6060,
In python they use indentation to express so-called code-blocks

def example():
    #4 space indentation
    # this route-sign also called pound-sign is used for single line comments
    # if you use 3 adjacent single quote's you can use multiple comment-line's
    #     but you have to close the comment with 3 adjacent single quote's
    #
    # now you can write your print statement likr
    print "this is a sample string"

# now you start the code line on pos-0
# therewith indicating the end of your `example` function
#
#you can now call the `example` function
example()

================================================

Read the Function talk
and concentrate on the terms
parameter
argument
return statement vs. print statement

the FUNCTION talk

def myFunc( param1, param2):
    # Begin of =myFunc= FUNCTION-BODY
    # this =myFunc= function- has 2 PARAMETERS param1 and param2
    # param1 and param2 PARAMETERS are used 
    # as -local- VARIABLES throughout the =myFunc= FUNCTION-BODY
    print( param1 + " and " + param2 )
    #End of =myFunc= FUNCTION-BODY

If you want to call/execute the myFunc function
you will have to add a pair of parentheses to myFunc
like
myFunc()
As the myFunc function was defined
as having 2 parameters
you have to provide 2 arguments
in our case 2 string VALUES "Alena" and "Lauren"
like
myFunc("Alena","Lauren")

some quotes from the outer-world:

**argument is the value/variable/reference being passed in,
parameter is the receiving variable used within the function/block**

OR

**"parameters" are called "formal parameters",
while "arguments" are called "actual parameters".**

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
++++ function with 1 parameter using return-statement

def myFunction( param1 ):
    # //Begin of =myFunction= FUNCTION-BODY
    # //=myFunction= function has 1 PARAMETER param1
    # //this param1 PARAMETER is used as a -local- VARIABLE
    # //throughout the =myFunction= FUNCTION-BODY
    return param1;
    # //End of FUNCTION-BODY

You have defined a myFunction function
which takes 1 parameter param1
this param1 parameter is used
as a variable throughout the =myFunction= FUNCTION-BODY.

If you want to call/execute this myFunction function
and this myFunction function was defined
as having 1 parameter param1
you will have to provide 1 argument
in our case a "number VALUE" 4
myFunction( 4 )

some quotes from the outer-world:

**argument is the value/variable/reference being passed in,
parameter is the receiving variable used within the function/block**

OR

**"parameters" are called "formal parameters",
while "arguments" are called "actual parameters".**

============================================

As you are using the return-statement in your myFunction function
you will only get a return-value no-display.
You can however capture this return-value in a variable
and then use the print-method to do a display.

theResult = myFunction( 4 )
print theResult

OR directly

print myFunction( 4 )

#7

for print eggs you should write print "Eggs!" not print "eggs!"


#8

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