Data Science: Usage Funnels, Warby Parker Project

Hello, Codecademy Community

Here is my take on the Warby Parker project.

The presentation is here: https://github.com/rmaresgit/CodeCademy---Warby-Parker-Project

Your feedback is much appreciated.

Hi @system5988591166, Thank you for posting your project in the forums! :slight_smile:

I also did this project awhile ago & understand the requirements of what info you’re supposed to present. It was a fun one (IMO).

  • Each of your slides contains a lot of information, but it is well-spaced out & clear to read.

  • A couple things to keep in mind if you were really presenting this information in front of stakeholders is:
    1.) know your audience and;
    2.) less is more (in regards to information contained on each slide.)
    What I mean by those things are, if you are presenting to non-tech oriented people, perhaps they don’t care about your SQL queries. You can always put your SQL queries or python statistical tests in an Appendix at the end of your slides. That way, if someone IS interested in seeing the data/tech stuff, you can explain/show it to them. The second thing is applicable to all presentations. It’s something that a mentor of mine told me when I showed him a presentation with A LOT of info. You can have more info contained in your speakers notes and just have key points & findings on the slides.

  • with the slide that has 3 pairs vs. 5 pairs–Maybe it would be better to show the actual percentages? 3 pairs at 53% & 5 pairs at 79% ? It’s just a thought.

  • I think it would be beneficial to have a Summary or Recommendations slide at the end that sums up your findings:
    " -Users taking the quiz tend to drop off after question 3 & 5- (80% & 75%).

  • A/B tests revealed that users who tried on 5 pairs at home had higher purchase rates (79%) than those that had 3 pairs to try on (53%).
    -Browse to Try-On rate is 75%.
    -Try-On to Purchase rate is 66%.
    -Most popular model is Eugene Narrow…" etc. etc.

  • I also like that you had very minimalistic slides. (I’m a minimalist when it comes to these things). I think a busy background takes away from the information contained within it.

Good work! :partying_face:

Hello, Lisa

Thank you so much for your feedback.
I appreciate the time you spend taking the time to review.

Indeed is a fun project, and I learn a lot about what companies are asking from the analyst.

I’ll polish my presentation skills for the next ones, and now I understood why it is requested to have the queries in a separate file.
I was following the template; therefore, include the queries in there; however, you are right: You need to know your audience.

Best regards,

Rodolfo Mares

| lisalisaj Super User
July 15 |

  • | - |

Hi @system5988591166, Thank you for posting your project in the forums! :slight_smile:

I also did this project awhile ago & understand the requirements of what info you’re supposed to present. It was a fun one (IMO).

  • Each of your slides contains a lot of information, but it is well-spaced out & clear to read.

  • A couple things to keep in mind if you were really presenting this information in front of stakeholders is:
    1.) know your audience and;
    2.) less is more (in regards to information contained on each slide.)
    What I mean by those things are, if you are presenting to non-tech oriented people, perhaps they don’t care about your SQL queries. You can always put your SQL queries or python statistical tests in an Appendix at the end of your slides. That way, if someone IS interested in seeing the data/tech stuff, you can explain/show it to them. The second thing is applicable to all presentations. It’s something that a mentor of mine told me when I showed him a presentation with A LOT of info. You can have more info contained in your speakers notes and just have key points & findings on the slides.

  • with the slide that has 3 pairs vs. 5 pairs–Maybe it would be better to show the actual percentages? 3 pairs at 53% & 5 pairs at 79% ? It’s just a thought.

  • I think it would be beneficial to have a Summary or Recommendations slide at the end that sums up your findings:
    " -Users taking the quiz tend to drop off after question 3 & 5- (80% & 75%).

  • A/B tests revealed that users who tried on 5 pairs at home had higher purchase rates (79%) than those that had 3 pairs to try on (53%).
    -Browse to Try-On rate is 75%.
    -Try-On to Purchase rate is 66%.
    -Most popular model is Eugene Narrow…" etc. etc.

  • I also like that you had very minimalistic slides. (I’m a minimalist when it comes to these things). I think a busy background takes away from the information contained within it.

Good work! :partying_face:

You’re welcome! :partying_face: