Ask an Instructor: How to Jumpstart Your Career in Tech

Thank you for your reply! I’ll would like to add up a couple of questions.
I’m from Brasil and I’m hoping to find a job outside my country remotely or not. First question

Is it true that not having a diploma and/or a US diploma makes getting hired very difficult?

And for the second question:

Why would a company hire someone from another country apart from the obvious reason that they will pay less?

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Great question! And it’s great that you are investing so much thought into your portfolio. It’s one of the most important things employers will consider. Since you’re interested in Front-End Engineering and Design and I’d definitely encourage you to showcase your design skills as much as possible. Focus on making your page visually appealing and intuitive to navigate. Within your portfolio focus on sharing projects where you’ve created user-facing applications that are optimized for accessibility, and have clear and natural-feeling user flows. Make sure your applications are responsive and mobile first as it’s becoming increasingly common to engage with the internet from a phone rather than a computer browser. I’d also get comfortable with building mobile applications using a framework like React Native.

This is going a bit deeper into the weeds of mobile, but it wouldn’t hurt to learn other languages like Java, Kotlin, or Swift for building native mobile applications. Codecademy has courses for all three. Good luck!

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Thanks so much! I will keep all of this in mind as I build my portfolio. TypeScript seems to be very popular in the industry - would you recommend learning that as well?

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I’m definitely not an expert in this area, unfortunately! What I would say is that to get hired without a diploma, or to get hired by a foreign company, it makes it that much more important to have a strong portfolio that speaks to your specific skillset.

Best of luck!

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I think our Intro to UI and UX Design is a great place to develop your knowledge of design. CSS can be really nuanced and there is a lot of cool and advanced stuff you can do with it, so if you haven’t checked our our Intermediate CSS content yet, I think that would also be a great place to continue your learning journey.

Once you’ve wrapped up JS, following up with Learn React would be a great next step.You’ll learn how to design and style more advanced interfaces and create more robust user-facing applications. Good luck!

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Hi! while writing the code, I have noticed that I have trouble interpreting it in basic english, for example I know how the code works but I have trouble in explaining it to myself/some one and writing comments in the code file. Or writing in README file. How can I overcome this?

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Thank you so much!

I appreciate your awesome advice and will heed it all. I did finish the Building Websites with HTML, CSS and Github skill path recently. It was fun and challenging. That’s why I’m excited to keep learning and growing in this field!

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Thank you everyone from Codecademy for making this event. It’s the best medicine against anxiety for those of us who are in this new journey. I’ll post my last question but there is no need to prioritize this one as it is a bit more “personal”. Feel free to skip it if you can’t find the time.

I can’t tell exactly what I wanna do in tech but I do know I have a natural problem solving ability and I like to go in deep into more technical subjects. To clarify, I spent a month building a program in C that generates a graphic based on the length of the words typed. All made in the command prompt. All my own code with very few libraries used. And I had a lot of fun doing it. Where would someone who thrives in this more backbone technical coding area find a good place to settle career wise? I’m sorry if it sounds confusing but this is the best I could explain it.

Thank you all once again!

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Certainly! TypeScript is a super marketable skill and can help improve your efficiency as a developer by catching type errors that might’ve otherwise been difficult to flag down. All of this can save time and make you a stronger, more intentional programmer.

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Thank you again! Have a great afternoon!

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Great question! This is definitely a tricky thing, and a super important skill that takes time to development. A couple tips:

Try using psuedocode as a stage in-between the code and a plain english description. This can help make the jump to plain English a little easier, by first writing in “code-like” English.

Try translating small chunks of code at a time. Instead of trying to describe an entire function at once, for example, start by just translation the initialization (i.e. the inputs). Then translate the first few lines. Once you’ve done each small piece, try to combine those into a larger description.

Try talking it out to a friend, instead of writing! Sometimes it is easier for folks to do it verbally, or with the ability to draw diagrams, instead of directly to text.

Honestly, this is hard and just comes with practice! So try to be patient :slight_smile: Good luck with everything!

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Yes, thank you so much for your time and this space!! This forum has been great, encouraging, and incredibly informative.

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Hey @melaniepwilliams! I’m learning front-end-development as well, reading your response, following questions came to my mind:
Is there a template that one can get an idea from about making websites that are optimized for accessibility and are intuitive to navigate? Where to get this knowledge from?

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Thanks alot @adamorse. I truly appreciate your detailed response.

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Hi that’s a great question! Your thinking is spot on. While you may not have experience in a production environment at a company, the things you’ve built on your own can demonstrate some really valuable knowledge and skills. If you don’t already have a portfolio, I’d highly recommend building one. This will be a place where employers can reference your best work. Ideally your portfolio will be curated, and share the projects you are most excited about/proud of.

It’s also worthwhile to contribute to open source projects to demonstrate that you are not only comfortable writing code from scratch, but also know how to add to an existing code base, which is it’s own unique skill. This will also give you the experience you’re seeking in contributing to production level code AND it will give you the opportunity to get feedback from experienced developers. Codecademy has some resources for getting started with Open Source if you are interested. Good luck!

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Hello CodeCademy team and everyone,

I come from a linguistic background - previously I studied Japanese translation as my bachelor degree and I used to work in Japan around a few years in the media/advertising/publication industry as a professional account executive. I’ve heard that NLP is more suitable for me, however, I am very keen to learn cloud computing and am currently working on the AWS Solutions Architect certification. I am also quite interested in Data Analytics and Business Analytics.

Since I’ve got a long career gap, I guess I am kind of lost myself - don’t really know what I should do/ what I could do. I am now thinking of returning to university to rebuild my confidence. Which course / route would you recommend from a future employability point of view for people like me with a non-stem background?

Any advice would be much appreciated!

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Hello,

Thanks for coming by! In terms of not knowing what you can and should do, to get a bit philosophical, I’d recommend taking a step back and asking what you want to do. If you are not entirely sure, think of a job as a series of problems you are responsible for solving. Ask yourself, what kind of problems do you enjoy solving the most?

In terms of what you can do, I’d say looking into certifications is a great place to start, particularly if you start building out a professional portfolio on Github to showcase your work. I mentioned this in a different answer, but I think doing things like this is also a great place for you to start. I’d recommend looking at the LinkedIns of people who have jobs you find interesting, and look for people with similarly non-traditional backgrounds (I assure you we’re out there). Then connect with those people and get a sense how what they did to put themselves in a position to find an opportunity, or even if the job they do is something you’d actually be interested in.

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Definitely! Our Learn CSS Accessibility course is a great place to start. We’ve also got an Intro to UI and UX Design course that will get you started in learning the basics in building intuitive user flows. Our Front-End and Full-Stack Career Journey’s also have an entire section on Building Interactive Websites which takes you a bit deeper into building accessible front-end applications. Hope this helps!

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And that’s a wrap folks! Be sure to subscribe to our official HQ Events Chapter to stay up to date with upcoming events hosted by Codecademy.

See you next time!

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