27.Looks For-In To Me?


#1


https://www.codecademy.com/courses/objects-ii/5/1?curriculum_id=506324b3a7dffd00020bf661

Oops, try again. It looks like you printed 4 when you shouldn't have!


var languages = {
    english: "Hello!",
    french: "Bonjour!",
    notALanguage: 4,
    spanish: "Hola!"
};

// print hello in the 3 different languages
for (var x in languages) {
    if (typeof x == "string") {
        console.log(languages[x]);
    }
}


#2

@billiamjbillerson,
By using using the condition

you are checking if the property-key x is a string type
instead
you should be checking the data-type of the associated-Value
like
typeof languages[x] == "string"

=====================================================

T h e - B a s i c s

An object has one or more properties seperated by a comma-,
Each property consists of a property-key and it's associated VALUE

var nyc = {
       fullName: "New York City",
       mayor: "Bill de Blasio",
       population: 8000000,
       boroughs: 5
      };
nyc -object- S p e c i f i e d

The nyc object has 4 properties seperated by a comma-,
- a fullName property with property-key fullName and it's associated string value of "New York City"
- a mayor property with property-key mayor and it's associated string value of "Bill de Blasio"
- a population property with property-key population and it's associated number value 8000000
- a boroughs property with property-key boroughs and it's associated number value 5

for - in - loop - e x p l a i n e d

With the for-in-loop you have a Method
which will iterate over all properties of a given object.
At each iteration it will assign the property-key as a string
to a variable name of your choice.
Thus for (var x in nyc)
will lead to 4 iteration's
iteration-1 var x = "fullName";
iteration-2 var x = "mayor";
iteration-3 var x = "population";
iteration-4 var x = "boroughs";
As they want you to display the property-key and NOT it's associated VALUE
you would use
console.log( x );

If they wanted you to display the associated VALUE of the propery-key you would use
console.log( nyc[x] );


#3

Why can't I use languages.x rather than languages[x]? I thought they meant the same thing


#4

@vadkoski

var james = {
    job: "programmer",
   married: false,
   sayJob: function() {
          // complete this method
          console.log("Hi, I work as a" + this.job);
    }
 };

Description of the james object.
The james object has 3 properties which are seperated by a comma-,

there is a job property with property-key job and it's associated string value 'programmer'
there is a married property with property-key married and it's associated boolean value false
there is a sayJob property with property-key sayJob and it's associated anonymous function VALUE
( they also would 'say', the james-object has the sayJob()-Method )

access via dot-notation

james.job ==> you will get the associated string VALUE of the job property-key, thus
you get the string VALUE 'programmer'

james.married ==> you will get the associated boolean VALUE false

james.sayJob ==> you will get the associated anonymous function VALUE
to call/execute this method you add a pair of parenthesis-( )
james.sayJob();

access via the square-bracket-notation

1 using the literal property-key

james["job"]
james["married"]
james["sayJob"]()

2 using the property-key by reference (=== via a variable )

var propertyKey1 = "job";
var propertyKey2 = "married";
var propertyKey3 = "sayJob";
james[propertyKey1] ==> you will get the associated string VALUE of the job property-key, thus
you get the string "programmer"

james[propertyKey2]
in this case you will get the boolean VALUE of the married property
being false

james[propertyKey3]();
would =display= "Hi, I work as a programmer"


#5

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